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 New Stick Tech video: comparing the Stickup, ACTV-2 & PASV-4 
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Stick Enterprises, Inc.
Stick Enterprises, Inc.

Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 1:30 pm
Posts: 830
Post Re: New Stick Tech video: comparing the Stickup, ACTV-2 & PA
Frustrating not to have all three Stick pickup modules interchangeable in a common diagonal channel, and with the same pair of fastener screw holes. It's not that I didn't think of it. Who wouldn't? It was a modular design to begin with.

As Greg said, the "Stickup" housing and rear lid are injection molded. Carbon fibers are mixed with the plastic to form a conductive / resistive web for grounding and shielding. This enclosure shields from EMF very well, like a solid metal housing, but without attenuating the high frequencies. Metal enclosures around pickup coils form eddy currents that choke off highs.

I can't reduce the size of the two "Block" modules and still get all the components inside. I could expand the Stickup housing to fit snugly inside the Block channel and such a mold would be a good investment, except that I'd have all this extra empty space inside. I'd be tempted to add electronic features but the whole point of the Stickup design was its simplicity. (I've even been known to remove the volume controls.)

So why not have the Stickup housing CNC machine cut as with the ACTV-2 and PASV-4 Blocks? Thick sheet plastic impregnated with carbon fibers is expensive and very hard on cutting tools.

Adding up these considerations, maybe some of you will understand why in this instance I didn't make the leap to the complete swap concept.

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Tue Apr 26, 2016 1:29 pm
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Post Re: New Stick Tech video: comparing the Stickup, ACTV-2 & PA
BSharp wrote:
Frustrating not to have all three Stick pickup modules interchangeable in a common diagonal channel, and with the same pair of fastener screw holes. It's not that I didn't think of it. Who wouldn't? It was a modular design to begin with.

As Greg said, the "Stickup" housing and rear lid are injection molded. Carbon fibers are mixed with the plastic to form a conductive / resistive web for grounding and shielding. This enclosure shields from EMF very well, like a solid metal housing, but without attenuating the high frequencies. Metal enclosures around pickup coils form eddy currents that choke off highs.

I can't reduce the size of the two "Block" modules and still get all the components inside. I could expand the Stickup housing to fit snugly inside the Block channel and such a mold would be a good investment, except that I'd have all this extra empty space inside. I'd be tempted to add electronic features but the whole point of the Stickup design was its simplicity. (I've even been known to remove the volume controls.)

So why not have the Stickup housing CNC machine cut as with the ACTV-2 and PASV-4 Blocks? Thick sheet plastic impregnated with carbon fibers is expensive and very hard on cutting tools.

Adding up these considerations, maybe some of you will understand why in this instance I didn't make the leap to the complete swap concept.


I am sure you have considered it. But couldn't you do a somewhat over-sized (common to all three) channel and do a QR bracket and spacers?

I would think that not having to wait for the customer to decide on the pick up module would greatly speed things up as you could rout and send out for finishing on the front end. And then being able to just pop in the customer selected pick up on final inspection/QC could greatly streamline production?

And as a quick aside.. We spoke about a mono switch around 1987. I am very glad you have finally adopted "my" idea (sarcasm). I have one on my (new to me) Railboard and it is a very welcome addition!
Thanks!


Wed Apr 27, 2016 8:14 am
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Stick Enterprises, Inc.
Stick Enterprises, Inc.

Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 1:30 pm
Posts: 830
Post Re: New Stick Tech video: comparing the Stickup, ACTV-2 & PA
Can't just "pop in" pickups. They must be height adjusted from the bottom to bring the entire module close to the strings. Then adjust the Stickup's Humbucking setscrews for balancing volume of individual strings, or the Block's bar pickups for very close clearances to thinnest, highest pitched strings when they're held down at the highest pitched fret, backing off the height for the thickest, low pitched strings.

For those who want to replace their Block with a Stickup, I usually fasten a Block rear cover plate onto the Stickup's underside and it sits height adjustable right there in the larger diagonal channel.. Not quite right visually but it does the job.


Wed Apr 27, 2016 11:02 am
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Post Re: New Stick Tech video: comparing the Stickup, ACTV-2 & PA
BSharp wrote:
Frustrating not to have all three Stick pickup modules interchangeable in a common diagonal channel, and with the same pair of fastener screw holes. It's not that I didn't think of it. Who wouldn't? It was a modular design to begin with.

As Greg said, the "Stickup" housing and rear lid are injection molded. Carbon fibers are mixed with the plastic to form a conductive / resistive web for grounding and shielding. This enclosure shields from EMF very well, like a solid metal housing, but without attenuating the high frequencies. Metal enclosures around pickup coils form eddy currents that choke off highs.

I can't reduce the size of the two "Block" modules and still get all the components inside. I could expand the Stickup housing to fit snugly inside the Block channel and such a mold would be a good investment, except that I'd have all this extra empty space inside. I'd be tempted to add electronic features but the whole point of the Stickup design was its simplicity. (I've even been known to remove the volume controls.)


So why not have the Stickup housing CNC machine cut as with the ACTV-2 and PASV-4 Blocks? Thick sheet plastic impregnated with carbon fibers is expensive and very hard on cutting tools.

Adding up these considerations, maybe some of you will understand why in this instance I didn't make the leap to the complete swap concept.


Interesting, I work in injection molding and we are molding a couple of low volume parts using two different materials by a company called Electriplas. One has stainless steel fibers, the other has carbon-fiber - nickel additives in it. If I remember right that CF/Nickel is for a part that needs to provide electrical shielding, and the other provides continuity. Not an easy material to mold with, one needs larger gate sizes in the molds otherwise the material chokes and does not want to flow into the mold because of the metal components of the resin - not to mention the CF one is even worse having the carbon in it. Once we figured the right gate size, it works.

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